There are two types of medication used to induce ovulation: tablets (oral medication) or daily injections of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH). If you are having ovulation induction at the same time as IUI treatment, either type of medication is suitable.

Oral medications

The most common oral medication is Clomiphene Citrate, known as Clomid or Serophene.

Clomiphene blocks oestrogen receptors in the body. This tricks the brain into increasing hormone production to stimulate development of one or more follicles on the ovary. Follicles are the small fluid filled sacs on the ovary which contain an egg. If they develop, and mature, they release an egg (ovulation). Clomiphene is usually taken for 5 days in the first half of your menstrual cycle.

Monash IVF tip: Clomiphene may have some side effects which usually pass within a few days of stopping the medication. They include hot flushes, thickening of cervical mucus, mood changes and irritability.

FSH injections

Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is a pure hormone injected daily in the first half of your menstrual cycle. It is injected just under the skin with a very fine needle (usually as a pen-device). It is easy to inject yourself with the needle, and our fertility nurses are on hand to show you how to do it and offer support.

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